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The Nocturnomicon

Everything you Need to Know about Jungle Nocturne

Introduction

Hey, I'm PsiGuard. I'm a Diamond-level Nocturne main with over 500 thousand mastery points on the champion. I've also written a number of top League of Legends guides on MOBAFire over the years. I have experience playing Nocturne in every season in both solo queue and team play. I play on NA and have mained jungle since season 3.

Nocturne is a hybrid between an AD bruiser and assassin. Due to his sticking power and target selection, he's well-equipped to chase down squishy carries. He also has strong stat steroids which make him a capable duelist. You can build bruiser for 1v1 power and front-line tankiness for your team, or you build lethality items to instakill vulnerable carries and supports.



Best Overall Runes


Spells

Skill Priority

Best Overall Build



Pros

  • Powerful post-6 ganks
  • Fast clear speed (though not as fast as Hecarim or Karthus)
  • Can burst and DPS
  • Can nullify many ultimates or strong abilities in 1v1 with spell shield
  • R makes it difficult for enemies to safely rotate or farm alone mid-game
  • Flexible build

Cons

  • Mediocre early game ganks
  • No dash ability (outside of ultimate)
  • Limited crowd control
  • Not great at initiating team fights (good followup though)

Runes

  • Bruiser
  • Assassin




Bruiser Runes

As a Bruiser, Lethal Tempo and Conqueror are the best keystones available to Nocturne. I recommend Lethal Tempo for most games, as it gives the best scaling DPS and works well with items like Black Cleaver and Wit's End. Conqueror is better for early game dueling, as you can stack it quickly with abilities and the healing will give you an edge in 1v1s.

I recommend Last Stand over Coup de Grace since it'll help you win important 1v1s while Coup de Grace is often not necessary to secure kills. Ultimate Hunter is preferred as a secondary rune since Nocturne's ult is very important to his success. Eyeball Collection offers more value than Sudden Impact for the other secondary rune.

Assassin Runes

The rune page is much the same for the Assassin build, but you'll take Electrocute to maximize your burst damage. I've tried Coup de Grace (with either Triumph or Legend: Alacrity) as a secondary rune but in my experience it doesn't offer enough value. The heal from Triumph and DPS from Alacrity are more consistently useful.

Summoner Spells

  • Summoners

You should take Flash in the vast majority of games. Flash allows Nocturne to maintain his E tether on enemies that use dashes or their own Flash to try to escape. It also gives you a way to follow enemies over walls, outplay key abilities when your spell shield is down, and lets you escape sticky situations. It's a hard spell to beat in terms of versatility and value.

Ignite is a viable replacement in a few matchups. It'll give you an edge in 1v1s against duelists, especially those with healing like Olaf, Warwick and Xin Zhao. You can opt to avoid 1v1s and take Flash, but Ignite gives you the option to fight these champions directly. Against Olaf and Warwick, use Ignite when they're below half health, since that's when they're strongest and heal the most.

Abilities

Nocturne's abilities are fairly straight-forward, but there are a few tricks you can use to make the most out of them.

  • Abilities

Skill Order

  • Q>E (Default)
  • Q>W (DPS)

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Q->W->E is a reliable opening for the early game. Q and W will give you the stats you need to clear jungle camps, while E is mostly relevant for ganks or dealing with invades from the enemy jungler. It's possible to go Q->W->Q->E to slightly increase your clear speed, but it severely limits your options until level 4. I recommend only doing this if you are very confident that no fights will require your help until you've finished your full clear (e.g. You and the enemy Zac are just full-clearing in opposite directions and your mid laner is a low-action farm lane like Veigar vs Galio).

Maxing E second is standard, since the increased fear duration is good for chasing down ranged champions as well as 1v1ing melees. The main exceptions are mostly melee, spell-oriented champions with low mobility, since you won't need the fear duration to hit them reliably, and the CC won't reduce their DPS by much. Champions like Mordekaiser, Dr. Mundo and Cho'Gath will be easier to fight with W max. Olaf can also ignore your CC with his R, which puts him in this category. Maxing W second against these kinds of champions will give you higher DPS and increase your chances of winning 1v1s against them.

Item Builds

  • Bruiser
  • Assassin



  • Starting Items
  • Mythics
  • Boots
  • Bruiser Core
  • Assassin





  • Damage
  • Defense
  • Vision

Jungle Matchups

Matchups are not as important for junglers as they are for laners, since you can often avoid your opponent and still do your job, even if you can't beat them 1v1. That said, it's still useful to know what kind of advantages and disadvantages you have going into a game against various junglers. Below, I'll organize some of the more popular jungle champions into difficulty levels and give you some tips on how to play against them.

Just because a matchup is labeled "Hard" doesn't mean you can't pick Nocturne into that champion. Likewise, Easy matchups may make your early game better, but you should still consider the other 8 champions in the game when drafting Nocturne (more on that in the following chapter).

  • Hard
  • Medium
  • Easy

Drafting Nocturne

You can absolutely pick Nocturne every game if you want, but he definitely works better with a good team composition or against champions that are vulnerable to assassins and divers. In this section, I'll quickly go over some criteria you can use to decide whether Nocturne is a good pick in your game.

Good Teammates

Nocturne works well with champions that either shore up his weaknesses (crowd control, team fighting, magic damage) or can enable his strengths (splitting the enemy team and picking them off). Champions that can help Nocturne in multiple ways synergize with him even more strongly.

  • Synergies
  • Engage / CC
  • Other



Enemies to Avoid

Red flags in draft often come in the form of annoying enemy supports, slippery carries, or champions that are otherwise strong against assassins and divers. Keep an eye out for the following enemy champions, as they often pose a bigger issue than your jungle matchup.

  • Peelers
  • Tanks
  • Slippery Ppl



Pathing

Pathing (and its sister skill, Jungle Tracking) is what separates competent junglers from great ones. It's a skill that's extremely difficult to master, but having a good foundational knowledge of pathing will make a huge difference to your early game (and therefore later stages of the game as well). If your goal is to become a better jungler, do not autopilot the same pathing every game.

You'll need to take into account a number of factors when deciding where to start, what route to take, and when to deviate from that initial route. You'll also have to make a lot of decisions throughout the early game that will affect your pathing options. Trying to make sense of all your options can be pretty daunting, but I'll be providing you with some basic rules and principles for you to build off of in your own games.

Starting Location

Your starting location is not set in stone based on your champion, and should instead vary from game to game. It'll take some thinking to figure out which camp to start at in your current game, so I encourage you to plan your starting route in champion select. If you wait until the 1:00 mark of the game to start thinking about your route, you're not going to make informed decisions.

There are 3 main reasons to start at a specific location.

  1. You want to gank a specific lane (either top or bot).
  2. You want to path towards a laner that will have priority.
  3. You want to path towards/away from the enemy jungler.

There can be other reasons (such as protecting your camps from an early invade, counterganking, or vertical jungling), but in the vast majority of your games, these are the three main factors that will determine your starting location. Let's break them down.

1. You want to gank a specific lane.

Take note of the champions for both teams in the top and bot lanes. Pathing towards laners with strong gank setup (CC, mobility) is more likely to result in a kill or at least burning an enemy Flash. Pathing towards a lane that is volatile or aggressive is also more likely to be successful. Conversely, pathing towards lanes that lack gank setup and are likely to be more passive is unlikely to yield kills for you early game.

For example, you have a Darius top vs a Kennen, and a Jhin and Nautilus bottom vs an Ezreal and Nami. While both of these lanes would be good to snowball, ganking bottom is much more likely to be successful with Jhin and Nautilus' CC, while Kennen is more likely to waste your time.

Gank setup isn't the only thing to consider. You'll also need to assess which lane is more important to victory. Your Maokai top might be able to set up kills for you against Vladimir, but your ganks are unlikely to change the outcome of that matchup. Likewise, ganking for Draven Pyke against Caitlyn Janna might be difficult, but your Draven could run away with the game if you get him a lead early.

Mid laners can also be a win condition for you to play around, but since you'll have access to mid no matter which direction you path, they don't usually factor in to your starting location. When playing for early ganks, start at your bottom buff to gank top, or at your top buff to path towards bot.

2. You want to path towards a laner that will have priority.

Priority means that your laner will be pushed when you go to their side of the map. A pushing wave means your laner will have better access to the river so they can rotate to help you fight for scuttle, protect your jungle from invades, or even follow you if you invade the enemy. Priority is most relevant when the enemy jungler is pathing towards you. In other words, if you and the enemy jungler are both pathing towards the same lane, you'll need to pay attention to priority.

Pathing towards lanes that will have priority is usually best in situations where you have few early gank options, or in matchups where the enemy jungler is stronger than you early. Even strong duelists like Trundle and Olaf will have to back off and respect your map control when your Caitlyn and Janna bot lane start rotating to scuttle while the enemy bot lane is under tower.

Keep in mind that while your laners are pushing, they are more vulnerable to ganks. A lot of jungle champions are comfortable ganking at level 3 and may race ahead of you to gank the side lane before you get there. While Nocturne usually prefers to full-clear and get to level 4 efficiently, it can be rewarding to choose a faster path to match the enemy jungler (more on that in the Jungle Tracking section).

3. You want to path towards/away from the enemy jungler.

I can't go into specifics on this topic yet, since we'll need to go over Jungle Tracking fundamentals first. For now, just keep in mind that some junglers (like Rengar or Warwick) will want to stop you from farming or making plays, while others (like Diana or Evelynn) will want to avoid you early. Pathing away from dangerous jungle duelists and towards weak ones is generally a good practice.

If you're not sure if you should match or avoid the enemy jungler, a good rule of thumb is that champions with strong scalings or power spikes later on (Evelynn at 6, Kayn after transformation, Master Yi after first item) tend to be much more vulnerable to early pressure. In regards to dangerous duelists, you'll need some understanding of the actual matchup, since Nocturne can actually beat a number of champions that seem to be strongest early game (like Rek'Sai, Elise and Lee Sin).

While the direction of your pathing is usually the most important choice you'll make, you also have a few options for how quickly you want to clear (which camps to take and which to skip).

Full Clear

Red -> Krugs -> Raptors -> Wolves -> Blue -> Gromp



Blue -> Gromp -> Wolves -> Raptors -> Red -> Krugs



In most games, you'll want to do a full clear. Nocturne's biggest power spike is at level 6, so the faster you can get experience, the more impact you'll have with your ultimate. The biggest downside to the full clear is that you'll be a bit late to scuttle and your opponent will get a chance to gank while you're still farming. Sometimes this is unavoidable, and the best thing you can do is to track the enemy jungler with pings and stick with your game plan, but in other cases, you can alter your route.

Red-side Clear

Red -> Krugs -> Raptors



Clearing your red-side gives you a window to transition-gank mid. This means you gank mid while crossing the map to the blue-side of your jungle. In most cases this route is more like an opportunistic interruption of a full clear (starting at Red), but you can also opt into this route intentionally if you have a strong plan for ganking mid at level 3.

Fast Top/Bot Gank

Red -> Raptors -> Gromp



This route sacrifices a lot of efficiency in order to make it to a side lane quickly. You'll usually use this if you're confident about the enemy's starting location and you know they'll be ganking a vulnerable lane at level 3. You'll also need to be sure you can win the 2v2 (for top) or 3v3 (for bot). If those factors check out, this is a great way to leverage Nocturne's strong level 3 dueling and deny the enemy jungler a win condition without setting you too far behind.

Keep in mind this is probably the riskiest route you have available, since if you don't get a gank or counter gank off, you'll just be delaying your level 6 spike for nothing.

Reverse Clear

Red -> Blue -> Gromp -> Wolves -> Raptors -> Krugs



Blue -> Red -> Krugs -> Raptors -> Wolves -> Gromp



This is basically a full clear, but you clear both of your buffs first. This is a very inefficient use of your time, but it's a way to flip the direction of your pathing. You'll usually want to do this to avoid invades or to ensure that you're pathing away from the enemy jungler (if you don't want to fight them). You can also flip your clear in order to intentionally path towards the enemy jungler if your goal is to contest them early.

Reverse clears usually become optimal when you lack information about the enemy's starting location and can't reasonably predict their pathing until you finish your first camp. This is around when enemy laners enter lane and show whether they leashed or not. If you're just finishing your buff and you realize you're pathing in a bad direction, you can go straight to your other buff and clear back in the opposite direction.

Jungle Tracking

Jungle tracking is a skill much like pathing, but it's much more underrated. Most League of Legends players focus only on the current actions of their champion and neglect the bigger picture. By making an effort to track the enemy jungler and predict where they might gank or which camps they've cleared, you'll be better equipped to make wise pathing decisions and you'll even be able to warn your teammates when they're likely to get ganked. Some teammates may not listen to your pings, but even if only half of your warnings are heeded, you'll find yourself winning a lot more early games.

Determining Enemy Starting Location

Step one to jungle tracking is to determine the enemy jungler's starting location. In a perfect world, you'd do this with wards in the enemy jungle, but deep wards aren't always safe to place at level one. More commonly, you'll have to figure out where the enemy jungler started by watching which side laners enter lane first. If the enemy top lane shows up in top right when the minions start fighting, but the enemy bot lane is still missing on the map, it's very likely that they're leashing for the enemy jungler (who is therefore on the bottom side of the map).

In some cases, both side lanes will arrive to lane late (one lane fakes a leash). It's a good idea to check to see if the laners are missing any health or mana, or if they have any other resources (like Fury or Rage) that might indicate that they leashed.

Other times, both side lanes will show on the minions right away, which means the enemy jungler is soloing their first camp. This is common for some champions such as Ivern, who can't receive leashes, or Diana, who can solo her first clear without help. Champions with strong AoE abilities like Diana, Kayn and Evelynn are likely to start Raptors if they're soloing their first camp. Others like Fiddlesticks can do more specialized routes solo (Fiddle clears pairs of camps at the same time). In these cases, early vision is crucial to determining where the enemy starts. A ward on the enemy Raptor camp or on enemy buffs is often beneficial if your team can invade safely at level 1 to place the vision.

Predicting Pathing

The enemy jungler's starting location is the most important piece of information for tracking them early game, but you'll still need to think about what kind of path they're likely to take. Champion knowledge pays off here, as knowing that Elise wants to get level 3 and gank, while Evelynn usually wants to clear all her camps to maximize her XP gain will give you a clue as to what their likely paths will be, even given identical starting locations.

Once you have a theory about what the enemy route might be, you'll need to keep your eyes open and be ready to update your predictions when you acquire new information. The first time you see the enemy jungler, press tab and check their CS (creep score). Each jungle camp is worth 4 CS, so divide their CS by 4 to figure out how many camps they've cleared. You'll also want to pan your camera and check their buffs. Left-clicking on the enemy jungler will show you the remaining duration of their buffs, which will also indicate which buff was cleared first. Combine that with the time the enemy jungler appears on the map and what their champion is best at clearing, and you'll get a fairly reliable picture of what camps they've cleared so far.

Tracking Example

Let's go through an example. You're on blue team playing against Elise and she shows on a ward at her Raptors. You see she's level 3 with an active Blue buff, 12 CS and she walks past Raptors without clearing them. You now know not only that she's at her red buff, but also that she's likely to look for a gank on your top or mid lane in about 30 seconds. If she doesn't see a good gank, she's likely to clear more of her red-side jungle while waiting for scuttle to spawn. It's also possible for her to invade you if she has lane priority, so you watch her top and mid laners to see if they leave vision towards your jungle. You ping her location to your teammates and let your mid and top laners know she's in the area. Elise tries to gank mid and gets your mid laner's Flash and forces them to recall, then crosses mid to go to the spawning bot scuttle. You check her CS and see that she has 20 CS and her red buff. You now know that her Raptors are likely gone, while her Krugs are probably still up. Your bot side is already cleared, so the only things Elise can do are clear bot scuttle and gank mid (who's not in lane) or bot. Your bot lane is pushing up, so you ping that they're in danger and they place a ward in river before carefully crashing the wave. Elise shows up on the ward, but your bot lane backs off safely. At this time, you've finished your full clear and are just cleaning up the top scuttle. Seeing no gank opportunities top or mid, you head to Elise's Krugs and clear them before recalling and heading back to your Krugs for your second clear. As you start your second clear, you ping that Elise's bottom camps are respawning. Your mid laner wards the bottom river as a precaution.

In the above example, "you" (the Nocturne) didn't gank or countergank any lanes and basically just power-farmed while Elise tried for two ganks and got one Flash out of it. To a less experienced player, it might seem like Elise is the only jungler doing their job, but in the following minutes, you'll be able to leverage your level and item lead, plus your matchup advantage to crush Elise in 1v1s or skirmishes, then apply even more pressure to the map once you hit 6. If you didn't track the enemy jungler, Elise might have gotten 2 or 3 kills in the early game, and you would have no idea where her next ganks would come from. By the time you're in a position to gank, Elise could have taken over the early game.

Jungle tracking should be a universal skill for all members of the team, but in reality a lot of your teammates in solo queue will completely ignore the map and fall prey to very predictable ganks. It's in your power to stop some (not all) of these ganks from succeeding, even if your champion isn't capable of confronting the enemy jungler directly. The better you get at tracking, you'll not only be able to warn your teammates of danger, but also empower yourself to get extra camps when you know they're uncontested, gank when you know you can't be counter-ganked, or even invade the enemy jungler for an early kill in the right circumstances.

Wave Management

While junglers don't have the constantly manage the minion wave like laners do, it's important to understand some of the basics of wave management. You'll not only need to decide whether to push the wave or not after a gank, but understanding wave management will help you predict what the lane states will be in the near future and whether you can set up a gank or dive.

The Even-minion Rule

The even-minion rule states that when there are an even number of minions for both teams, but the wave is closer to one team's side of the map, the wave will start to slow-push away from that side of the map. This happens because one team's reinforcing minions from the coming minion wave will join the fight sooner than the other, giving them an advantage in the push that will build up over time.

Slow-pushing

Slow-pushing is when one wave has a slight advantage over the other and starts to gain ground towards the enemy side of the map (usually while one laner carefully last-hits the minions as late as possible). When slow-pushing, you'll notice that the advancing minion wave will start to build up a large amount of minions before reaching the enemy tower. This gives the laner with the slow-pushing wave an advantage in trades and a temporary lead in experience.

You will basically never slow-push as a jungler, but you'll want to be able to recognize slow-pushes when they're happening. Slow-pushes often serve as good setups for tower dives. If you successfully kill the enemy or force them to retreat, they'll lose a huge amount of experience and gold as their tower kills the minions. This is the most rewarding type of gank.

Freezing

Freezing is when the minion wave is close to one tower, but doesn't reach tower range. Freezes can be maintained by laners in order to make their opponents more susceptible to ganks, or to allow them to farm safely. As a jungler, you may want to freeze the wave if the allied and enemy laners are dead or recalled. This denies experience to the enemy laner as your minions die to the enemy minions. Your laner will also get to collect the large wave that builds up as they're returning to lane.

The easiest way to execute a freeze is to tank the enemy minions and pull them towards the center of the lane (this is relevant when your minions are dead and the enemy wave would hit your tower without intervention). As long as there are 3-4 extra enemy ranged minions (spending on proximity to tower), you should be able to freeze.

Fast-pushing / Crashing

Fast-pushing or Crashing is when a champion clears the enemy minions as quickly as possible with the goal of pushing their wave under the enemy tower. This is usually the best option when your allied laner needs to recall after a gank (which is most of the time). Crashing a small wave that dies to tower before the enemy wave arrives results in a reset (which is a neutral wave state). Crashing a large wave, or crashing a wave while an enemy minion wave is under tower will result in a bounce (which starts a slow-push towards your side of the map).

You'll usually want to fast-push after a gank if your laner was slow-pushing before the gank, as long as they're planning on recalling. This will give them plenty of time to get back to lane without missing much CS. If the enemy has a large wave after the gank, you might need to freeze (especially if your allied laner is dead or recalled). If your ally is still in lane, they can usually set up the freeze themselves if they want to freeze.

In some cases, you may need to help your laner crash the wave, even if the enemy laner is still in lane. This generally happens when they're too weak or too low on health or mana to safely push the wave in. In these cases, showing up to simply push the wave to tower and give your laner a much-needed recall is the best thing you can do. Be careful about doing this, as it's only valuable if your laner actually needs the help and wants to recall, otherwise, you're just taking XP from them for no reason. It's best to communicate with your team if you're not sure if they need the help or not.

Minion Tax

Every time you gank or push a wave, you're taking away some of the experience they could be earning if they were alone in lane. If you personally kill some of the minions, you're also denying your ally gold. This is why it's important to know when your presence in lane is necessary, so you don't hurt your laners unintentionally. That said, in many cases (as explained above), you'll need to help push the wave.

As a carry champion, it is often optimal to take some of the last-hits while pushing. Laners hate losing minions, but the simple fact is that junglers can carry at least as well as laners can, if not better, and gold-reliant champions like Nocturne need to get resources for the time they invest into ganks.

Here's a few guidelines for deciding how many last-hits to take while pushing:

  • Take more CS if your laner is a tank or support champion like Maokai or Karma.
    • Take fewer if your laner is a gold-reliant carry like Yasuo or Kayle.
  • Crashing the wave quickly is more important than donating last-hits.
  • If you got the kill, let your laner have more of the CS.
    • If your laner got the kill, take more of the CS.
  • If you're already super strong, give CS to your laner.
    • If your laner is super strong, take more of the CS.
  • If the lane matchup is volatile (like Riven vs Fiora), let your laner have more CS.
    • If the lane matchup is stable (like Viktor vs Vel'Koz), take more of the CS.
  • Lastly, if your laner is likely to tilt or ragequit if you take CS, just give them the CS.

Team Fighting

Team fighting is arguably the most difficult topic to teach, as it has the most variables. With so many possible champions, game states and circumstances, every team fight is going to play out differently. The best way to develop your team fighting skills is to simply play more games, but it can still help to get a rough idea of what Nocturne is and is not capable of.

Dive or Peel?

Nocturne's ultimate gives him the option to switch which side of a fight he's on and which target he's focusing at any moment. While it's usually used to give him a gap-closer onto an enemy carry, you can also save your ultimate for the first few seconds and simply hit the enemy front-line with your team. Once the enemy carries are vulnerable or at least committed to fighting your team, you can dive onto them.

In some cases where your backline is super strong (like a Kog'Maw or a fed Ryze), your job might just be to keep them safe while they kill everyone. In other cases, the main enemy threat might be a melee champion who dives into your team like Irelia. Peeling is an option to keep in mind, at least temporarily, until your backline is safe and you can use your ult aggressively. Peeling for your backline is more effective with the Bruiser build.

If the enemy is the one with the strong backline, chances are it'll be your job to shut them down. The best option is usually to dive onto them at the same time as one of your teammates, or sometimes to kite away from the enemy team to force enemy carries to spend time running towards you instead of dealing damage. Diving enemy carries is more effective with the Assassin build.

Regardless of which build you're going for, think about what 5v5 strategy works best for your team.

Darkness is Your Ally

By far the most underrated part of Nocturne's team fighting is the first cast of his ult, Paranoia. The enemy team will be nearsighted for 6 seconds, preventing them from benefitting from wards or allied vision. This is a massive factor in team fights that take place in the jungle, river, or around walls. The enemy will not be able to see inside bushes unless they're standing in the bush, and they won't be able to attack over walls or around corners. In some cases, this can effectively CC the enemy ADC for 6 seconds. While some champions can still contribute by throwing skillshots, they won't be able to see where they're aiming. This is especially annoying for champions like Jhin, Xerath and Ornn, who telegraph their ultimates and need time to land them skillshots.

Pay attention to both team's positions and cast your ult when the enemy is committed to the fight, but the enemy backline doesn't have a sightline onto your teammates. Tell your allies to fight inside bushes. This can be beneficial even in skirmishes or 1v1s, if the enemy loses vision of you at a key moment.

Even if you can't get an ideal ult off, the darkness will still deny a lot of information to the enemy. From the enemy Vayne's perspective, she may have no idea whether her teammates are winning or losing, or if her frontline is chasing or standing their ground. In strung-out fights, the enemy will often make strategic errors due to the lack of information. This can be mitigated with premade groups in voice comms, but in solo queue you can be sure that with every Nocturne ultimate comes a little bit of chaos.

Getting Picks During Team Fights

Assassins often need to lie in wait at the start of fights, biding their time until a window of opportunity presents itself. While Nocturne isn't a pure assassin, he can play team fights like one when appropriate. Sometimes this just means jumping in to finish off a key target that your teammates weaken, but other times you can create your own solo-picks on enemy carries, even when they're within spitting distance of their teammates.

When a fight is breaking out, take note of where the enemy squishies are. Is their Nami showing up to the fight late? Is their Ziggs trying to throw skillshots from over a wall? Is their Quinn coming from a flank and isolated from her team? In these cases, punish the enemy for mispositioning by forcing a 1v1 during your ult. This will probably be obvious to you during the game, but the trick is to consistently track the enemy champions and save your ultimate until it's most useful.

Capitalizing off Team Fights

As the team fight is ending, quickly take stock of the situation. How many members are left on both teams? Who's low on health or mana? Which objectives are up? Many players will simply follow along with whatever the first call is on their team. You need to be the person making the call to do baron, or to recall, or to push a tower. Even if you're dead, you can still ping and get your teammates to head to the right area to make use of the enemy respawn timers.

Generally if enemy respawn timers are long, the best thing you can do (given enough living allies to attempt it) is to take Baron. Dragon Soul and Elder Drake are also priorities, obviously. If none of these are possible, you can still look for towers, enemy jungle camps, or even just the opportunity to clear or place key vision. Recalling can be optimal if an objective is spawning soon and you need to be prepared to contest it.

There's no trick to always making the right call, and late-game shotcalling takes a lot of experience to master. Even if you're not confident in your macro yet, get into the habit of considering which objectives to take or when to push or recall after a play. The more proactive you are about coordinating your team, the more control you'll have over your games. Even if your teammates don't listen to your calls sometimes, it's better to make the call and sometimes have to abandon it than to stay silent and let your team decide what to do every game.

Conclusion

Thank you for taking the time to read my guide. I adore this champion since he came out way back in season one. I hope you have as much fun and find as much success (or more) than I have in your own Nocturne games. Remember to stay cool, /mute all if needed, and carry hard! <3





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DarkWalf88 3 months ago

A really well made guide, I approve it as a mastery 7 nocturne player